Elizabeth Bowen: A Literary Life

Palgrave Macmillan (2019), Most Recent.
Elizabeth Bowen: A Literary Life reinvents Bowen as a public intellectual, propagandist, spy, cultural ambassador, journalist, and essayist as well as a writer of fiction. Patricia Laurence counters the popular image of Bowen as a mannered, reserved Anglo-Irish writer and presents her as a bold, independent woman who took risks…
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Chinese Translation: Lily Briscoe's Chinese Eyes

Shanghai Bookstore Publishing Company, Shanghai: China (2008).

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Lily Briscoe's Chinese Eyes: Bloomsbury Modernism and China

Charleston, University of South Carolina Press (2003).
Lily Briscoe’s Chinese Eyes traces the romance of Julian Bell, nephew of Virginia Woolf, and Ling Shuhua, a writer and painter Bell met while teaching at Wuhan University in China in 1935. Relying on a wide selection of previously unpublished writings, Patricia Laurence places Ling, often referred to as the…
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The Reading of Silence: Virginia Woolf in the English Tradition

Stanford University Press (1991, 1993).
Virginia Woolf I want to write a novel about Silence…the things people don’t say. But the difficulty is immense,” says a character in Virginia Woolf’s first novel, announcing Woolf’s life-long preoccupation with silence and the barrier between the sayable and the unsayable. In reading Woolf’s many silences–psychological, social, historical,…
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Julian Bell: The Violent Pacifist (Biography, Monograph)

London: Cecil Woolf Publishers (June 2006).
Virginia Woolf described Julian Bell, her nephew, as ‘a wild ruffian’ as he rambled across the grounds of Charleston, the spoiled and favorite child of Vanessa Bell. As he grew into a man, he was variously labeled a poet, military strategist, conscientious objector, teacher, libertine, journalist, activist, but, most decidedly,…
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Virginia Woolf and the East (Monograph)

London: Cecil Woolf Publishers (1995).
Portrait of Virginia Woolf Virginia Woolf stands upon a bridge that connects not only the private and public worlds of women but also the developing aesthetics of writers of different countries. This expansive view of Woolf is not popular today (1995) as Bloombury-bashing critics charge that the principle…
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